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How To Install Underfloor Insulation

How To Install Underfloor Insulation

Jul 6, 2017

See how quick, clean and easy it is to install Knauf Insulation's Earthwool under the floors of your home with this new DIY installation video.See http://www.knaufinsulation.com.au for written instructions and more information.  
How To Install Acoustic / Sound Insulation

How To Install Acoustic / Sound Insulation

Jul 6, 2017

Watch the Home Team’s James Bawden, guide for installing Earthwool acoustic insulation in internal partition walls. Earthwool acoustic insulation is perfect for absorbing sound and reducing sound transfer between noisy rooms such as bathrooms, laundry and media rooms.
How To Install Wall Insulation

How To Install Wall Insulation

Jul 6, 2017

Earthwool Insulation is easy to install into the walls of your home, in this video we show you how.See http://www.knaufinsulation.com.au for written instructions and more information.
How To Install Ceiling Insulation

How To Install Ceiling Insulation

Jul 6, 2017

See how quick, clean and easy it is to install Knauf Insulation's Earthwool in the ceiling of your home with this new DIY installation video.See http://www.knaufinsulation.com.au for written instructions and more information.  
4 ways to save on your next electricity and heating bill

4 ways to save on your next electricity and heating bill

Sep 15, 2016

Conserving energy can help you save money as well as reduce your carbon footprint. Here are some easy ways you can save energy (and cash) around the house. 1. Change your bulbs Did you know that your conventional (incandescent) light bulb is actually a massive energy drainer? To put things into perspective, it takes around 60 watts (amount of energy used) for your average light bulb to produce 700 lumens (amount of light provided). LED or fluorescent bulbs emit the same number of lumens for only 10 watts, cutting down energy expenditure by six! LED lights can also last up to 10 times longer than the regular variety, making them a more efficient and economical lighting option. 2. Only heat and cool the rooms you’re using Energy wastage comes at a cost. Make sure no draughts are escaping or intruding from beneath doors and shut doors so that the temperature can remain consistent. This can help you spend less on heating and cooling. To save energy on lighting, open the curtains and use natural light during the day. On the other hand, keeping your curtains closed on a hot day helps to keep rooms nice and cool. 3. Switch off Why should electrical items you’re not actively using boost up your electricity bill? Turn off appliances like your TV and computer instead of having them running on standby mode. Devices like phone chargers and radios also use energy when they’re not in action. Turn them off at the power point and flick the switch back on when you actually need them. You could cut up to 10% off your energy usage by doing this alone. 4. Insulate your house properly A well-insulated home acts like an Esky in the summer and a Thermos in the winter. When your house has been properly insulated, internal heat doesn’t escape and external temperatures don’t intrude as easily. That means your heating and cooling devices aren’t working in vain to reach the set temperature, allowing you to save on your energy expenses. To learn more about cheap insulation options, talk to one of our experts. We’ll guide you through the insulation process so that you can enjoy the temperature of your home as efficiently and economically as possible.
What to know when buying insulation

What to know when buying insulation

Sep 15, 2016

If you’re currently in the process of renovating or constructing, you may wish to consider what insulation can do for your household. Here are some pointers to help you during this process. Insulation is measured in R values R values measure the heat resistance of insulation materials. The higher the R value, the harder it is for heat to escape or penetrate a room. Different insulation materials of varied R values should be used in different areas of a house. For example, ceiling insulation has a higher R values than floor insulation as heat rises and tends to escape from roofs. Insulation comes in different varieties and materials There are a number of materials you can use to insulate your house, including batts and blankets, boards and loose-fill. Batts and blankets are generally the most user-friendly option for those doing DIY projects. They come in the form of polyester, natural wool, glass wool and rockwool. Board insulation is made from polystyrene and comes in sheets. Loose-fill insulation is usually sprayed externally onto surfaces and comes in the form of cellulose fibre, polyester, natural wool and granulated rockwool. Blanket insulation is great for DIY projects If you’re looking to insulate your own project, the easiest option is to purchase blanket insulation, which comes in batts or rolls. Batts are precut sections of insulation material that you can easily slot into place, while you will need to cut rolls to the correct dimensions. When fitting your house with insulation, the aim is to pack the material as tightly as possible within frames and around vents, ducts, pipes and wires, making sure no gaps or spaces are left. If you’re going to insulate your own home, you want to do it right. Give one of our experts a call if you need more information about which types, materials and methods to use when it comes to completing an insulation job. We’ll help you buy the right insulation for any
Give your home some peace and quiet with acoustic insulation

Give your home some peace and quiet with acoustic insulation

Sep 15, 2016

When it comes to insulation, most people immediately think of heat regulation and energy conservation. While this is certainly one of its main uses, did you know that insulation can also be a great way to minimise noise in the home? That’s right – whether you live on a busy road, want to avoid hearing your kids down the hall in the TV room, or just need more privacy, you can give yourself some peace and quiet simply by making the right insulation choices. How does acoustic insulation work? Acoustic insulation works in the same way insulation regulates temperature – preventing noise from traveling in and out of rooms and between floors. To help understand acoustic insulation, think of sound as energy, moving in the form of waves. Essentially, the batts of insulation between your walls absorb the intensity of these waves. Putting batt or blanket insulation between studs or joints during renovation or construction is an inexpensive way to quieten household commotions. For cheap insulation options, call our experts. We can help you choose the best soundproofing options from a wide range of the most reputable brands. Which products should I use for sound insulation? If you’re doing DIY soundproofing, batts are the easiest to install; they’re premeasured and cut so that all you have to worry about is slotting them into place. Manufacturers including Pink Batts, Ausmalt and Earthwool all produce insulation for the specific purpose of absorbing noise (make sure you don’t confuse acoustic for high density batts as they do not serve the same purpose). Fasten them into place and tightly fit them between frames and around pipes, electrical boxes, wires, and heating ducts. Essentially, your aim is to leave as few gaps as possible so that the least amount of sound can penetrate your walls. The end result should reduce the intensity of external noises, allowing you to relax in peace and quiet. If you’d like to chat more about how you can stop disruptive noise travel in your home, call one of our experts. They’ll be able to advise you on the best noise minimisation options to suit your needs.
3 questions to ask when choosing insulation

3 questions to ask when choosing insulation

Sep 15, 2016

You have plenty of choice when it comes to brands of insulation in Australia – and at No Gap Insulation, we pride ourselves on only supplying insulation products from the finest brands. However, it’s important not to choose on brand alone – we always suggest your first consideration should be choosing the insulation that’s best for your project. Instead of asking, “what brand of insulation should I use?”, ask these questions instead: 1. Where do I need to insulate? To weatherproof your house, you will need adequate insulation in your ceilings and exterior walls. You may also need to insulate your floors. The kind of insulation needed in each area depends on the construction material and the way it is built – some areas are at risk of condensation buildup; others don’t have enough space in which to retrofit insulation. You may also need to insulate your interior walls to reduce sound travelling between rooms. If in doubt, ask for professional advice. 2. What R value do I need? The R value of your insulation is the measure of how well it locks in or releases heat. This is the key spec you need to know – and remember that it’s not directly related to the thickness of the insulation. Your region’s climate conditions influence the appropriate level and type of insulation you will need. Given Victoria’s varying temperatures throughout the year, it is important that you are protected against both hot and cold weather. In Victoria, the recommended R value for ceiling insulation is R5 (minimum 3.5). For external walls, it’s R2.5 (minimum 1.5), and for floors, it’s R2 (minimum R1). 3. Where can I find cheap insulation in Melbourne? At No Gap Insulation, we’ve been supplying low cost insulation products to builders and renovators across Victoria for more than 20 years. We only stock the best insulation products that Melbourne has to offer, but are able to keep the costs low. This means cheap Pink Batts, cheap Kingspan – cheap insulation, great quality. A well-insulated home is the most efficient way to provide year-round comfort and improve the energy efficiency of your building, saving you money on energy bills and reducing greenhouse gases. Call No Gap Insulation today for expert advice on your insulation project and a no obligation quote.
Understanding insulation – a quick guide

Understanding insulation – a quick guide

Sep 15, 2016

Insulation is essential to any building or renovation project and it doesn’t need to be expensive – you just need to know what product is the best for your need. Ultimately, knowing how to buy the right insulation will save you money on your energy bills Insulating your home can seem simple enough – buy rolls/bags of the stuff and… then what? Which types should you use for different areas and what should you know about them? R values The R value is the key spec to look out for when buying insulation. This indicates the thermal resistance of the material you use, and isn’t necessarily related to the thickness of the insulation. The higher the R value, the greater the insulation. Typically, floor insulation requires a lower R value and ceilings and walls require a higher R value. Blanket insulation Now that you know how to measure insulation, you’ll need to know which types to use. Blanket insulation is some of the most widely recognised form of insulation. It comes in two types: Batts (like the cheap Pink Batts we sell) are pre-cut blanket insulation. Rolls of blanket insulation are ready to be cut to specific sizes as necessary. The R value for blanket insulation ranges depending on where you want to put it. Both kinds are well suited for stud and joist spacing, relatively inexpensive and great to use for floors and ceilings. Wall insulation Wall insulation is used to reduce the loss of heat by filling the outer and inner spaces on the exterior of your home or in the spaces between your walls. For example, external wall insulation retains heat or prevents it from seeping in on a hot day. Melbourne’s climate means we get both cold winters and hot summers, so your wall insulation needs to protect against two extremes. Internal wall insulation isn’t important for cooling or heating but is a great sound barrier to use between rooms. When you’re buying external wall insulation, remember that the recommended R value in Victoria is R2.5, and the minimum is R1.5. Ceiling insulation Ceiling insulation is vital in ensuring that heat doesn’t escape through the roof of your home. The type you buy will depend on your ceilings, and whether you’re building a new home from scratch or renovating. The recommended R value for ceilings in Victoria is R5 and the minimum is R3.5. Floor insulation Floor insulation is necessary to ensure that the coldest and lowest parts of your home aren’t sapping your heat. However, because heat rises, the R value for floor insulation tends to be quite low, ranging between R1 and R3 in Victoria. If you’re still unsure about which insulation you need, give one of our experts a call for advice on your next project.

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